Annual Behavioural Science PhD Conference

Annual Behavioural Science PhD Conference2018-11-12T15:39:28+00:00

Thursday, 29th November 2018

UCD Geary Institute for Public Policy

The UCD Geary Institute for Public Policy is pleased to announce our PhD Student Conference in Behavioural Science for 2018 in collaboration with the Stirling University Management School. This continues successful annual events held at Dublin and Stirling. For information about last two year’s PhD conference click here and here. The PhD conference will be held at University College Dublin on November 29th and will be followed by the 11th annual Irish economics and psychology conference on November 30th. Attendees to the PhD conference on November 29th are also welcome to attend the November 30th workshop. To register for the event, click here.

The 2018 PhD Conference aims to give PhD students in Behavioural Science the opportunity to meet other researchers, to present their work, and get feedback from peers and researchers in the field. The PhD conference will deal with all areas of behavioural science (or behavioural economics, economic psychology, judgement and decision making, depending on your terminological preference). Speakers will present their research followed by a discussion. There will be no conference fee and a social dinner will be provided for attendees on the evening of November 29th. We look forward to welcoming you to Dublin. If you have questions, feel free to send an email to liam.delaney@ucd.ie

Programme of Events

TimeEvent
9.10 - 9.15Registration
9.15 - 10.00Welcome
Introductory Talk by Professor Liam Delaney and Dr Leonhard Lades
10.00 - 10.30Coffee Break
10.30 - 11.30 Session 1

Session 1a: The Environment
Dominika Czyz, Warsaw School of Economics: The social cost of carbon under habit formation and social concerns

Vanja Medugorac, University College Dublin: Ownership and governance of electricity and water resources: does psychological ownership have any role?

Session 1b: Risk
Andreas Markoulakis, University of Kent: An experimental investigation of risk behavior of gains and losses: The effect of higher stakes and time delay

Xuemin Zhu, University of Aberdeen, Health Economics Research Unit: The impact of life events on physicians’ risk attitude
11.30 - 12.00Coffee Break
12.00 - 13.00Session 2

Session 2a: Social Preferences
Katarína Čellárová, Masaryk University: Why do bystanders choose not to intervene to stop bullying? A laboratory experiment

Jonathan Yeo, University of Warwick: Social Identity and Incentives in Teams

Session 2b: Nudging and Public Policy
Bernardo Buarque, University College Dublin: Strengthening the case for nudging: The influence of a good default on subsequent self-control

Nathaniel Maddix, Harvard: Indebted Savers: Focusing Illusions and Optimism Biases for Debt and Savings
13.00 - 14.30Lunch Break and Networking Session
14.30 - 15.30Session 3

Session 3a: Life Satisfaction and Well-Being
Diane Pelly, University College Dublin: Evaluating Worker Well-Being Interventions

Jean Roch Donsimoni, Johannes Gutenberg University-Mainz: Technological Progress and Subjective Well-Being

Session 3b: Behavioural Microeconomics
Johann Han, CINCH - Health Economics Research Center: Selection into moral hazard in experimental insurance markets

Kenneth Devine, University College Dublin: Determinants of mortgage refinancing in a two-stage decision framework
15.30 - 16.00Coffee Break
16.00 - 17.00Session 4

Discrimination

Lara Vomfell, Warwick Business School, University of Warwick: (Statistical) Discrimination in Stop and Search

Karen Aruslamy, University College Dublin: Identifying taste and statistical discrimination against individuals with mental illness through a cooperation game